Gisela Stuart

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Gisela Stuart was the Labour MP for Birmingham, Edgbaston from 1997 until she stepped down at the 2017 general election.

Animals in Medical Research

In 2006, Gisela Stuart signed Early Day Motion 1850: Animals in Medical Research which noted that "animal research is only permitted where there is no better alternative and that pain and suffering are minimised and balanced against the potential benefit to humans and animals", supported "the building of the new state of the art biomedical research laboratory at Oxford University", condemned "unlawful animal rights extremism, including any violence, harassment or intimidation of those associated with lawful animal research", and supported "the well-regulated use of animals in medical research".[1]

Libel Law Reform

In December 2009, Gisela Stuart signed Early Day Motion 423 calling for a reform of the English libel law[2]. The motion noted that human rights activists, scientists, writers and journalists are currently prevented from publishing, and the public prevented from reading, matters of strong public interest due to the chilling effect of the law.

The motion was tabled following the recent formation of Libel Reform Coalition, which has the backing of Index on Censorship, English PEN and Sense about Science. Sense about Science have been campaigning in defense of a member of its board of trustees, author and journalist Simon Singh, who has been sued for libel by the British Chiropractic Association. They issued a statement entitled "The law has no place in scientific disputes".

Same-Sex Marriage

Gisela Stuart voted in favour of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill at both its second reading in February 2013[3] and its third reading in May 2013[4].

Mitochondrial Donation

In February 2015 Gisela Stuart voted in favour of allowing mitochondrial donation, which would allow women who carried mitochondrial diseases to give birth to children who would not inherit the disease[5]. An October 2014 briefing report by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), which had been investigating the issue for three years, stated that there was no evidence to show that mitochondrial donation was unsafe[6]. However, some religious groups had said that such procedures should not be allowed[7]. After clearing both Houses mitochondrial donation is now legal, regulated by the HFEA.

References

  1. http://www.parliament.uk/edm/2005-06/1850
  2. http://www.parliament.uk/edm/2009-10/423
  3. http://www.publicwhip.org.uk/division.php?date=2013-02-05&number=151&mpn=Gisela_Stuart
  4. http://www.publicwhip.org.uk/division.php?date=2013-05-21&number=11&mpn=Gisela_Stuart
  5. http://www.publicwhip.org.uk/division.php?date=2015-02-03&number=147&mpn=Gisela_Stuart
  6. http://www.hfea.gov.uk/docs/2014-10-01_Mitochondrial_donation__an_introductory_briefing_note_-_final.pdf
  7. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-31063500

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