Charles, Prince of Wales

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Prince Charles has demonstrated an interest in alternative medicine, the promotion of which has occasionally resulted in controversy.[1] In 2004, Charles' "Foundation for Integrated Health" (FIH) divided the scientific and medical community over its campaign encouraging general practitioners to offer herbal and other alternative treatments to National Health Service patients,[2][3] and in May 2006, Charles made a speech to an audience of health ministers from various countries at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, urging them to develop a plan for integrating conventional and alternative medicine.[4]

In April 2008, The Times published a letter from Edzard Ernst that asked the Prince's Foundation to recall two guides promoting "alternative medicine", saying: "the majority of alternative therapies appear to be clinically ineffective, and many are downright dangerous." A speaker for the foundation countered the criticism by stating: "We entirely reject the accusation that our online publication Complementary Healthcare: A Guide contains any misleading or inaccurate claims about the benefits of complementary therapies. On the contrary, it treats people as adults and takes a responsible approach by encouraging people to look at reliable sources of information... so that they can make informed decisions. The foundation does not promote complementary therapies."[5] Ernst has recently published a book with science writer Simon Singh condemning alternative medicine called Trick or Treatment: Alternative Medicine on Trial. The book is ironically dedicated to "HRH the Prince of Wales" and the last chapter is very critical of his advocacy of "complementary" and "alternative" treatments.

A former trustee of the FIH Stephen Gordon is standing as the Liberal Democrat candidate for South West Norfolk in the 2010 General Election.

Duchy Originals

The Prince's Duchy Originals produce a variety of CAM products including a “Detox Tincture” that Professor Edzard Ernst has denounced as "financially exploiting the vulnerable" and "outright quackery".[6] In May 2009, the Advertising Standards Authority criticised an email that Duchy Originals had sent out to advertise its Echina-Relief, Hyperi-Lift and Detox Tinctures products saying it was misleading.[7] The Prince personally wrote at least seven letters[8] to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) shortly before they relaxed the rules governing labelling of such herbal products. A move that has been widely condemed by scientists and medical bodies.

Lobbying

On 31st October 2009 it was reported that Prince Charles had personally lobbied Health Secretary Andy Burnham regarding greater provision of alternative treatments on the NHS.[6]

References

  1. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=9D03E6DE163BF93AA35752C0A963948260
  2. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article555157.ece
  3. http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,6903,1248282,00.html
  4. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/24/world/europe/24iht-royals.html
  5. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/alternative_medicine/article3760857.ece
  6. 6.0 6.1 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mandrake/6474595/Prince-Charles-lobbies-Andy-Burnham-on-complementary-medicine-for-NHS.html
  7. http://www.quackometer.net/blog/2009/03/duchy-originals-pork-pies.html
  8. http://www.dcscience.net/?p=89